Vintage Treasure Tuesday #2

Up next in our “Vintage Treasure Tuesday” series is this interesting piece I acquired at the What Cheer Flea Market in early August. It’s a chunk of wood with a handle on one side and a design carved on the bottom, and it was used to print the design onto fabric or possibly wallpaper.

Fabric printing block | Hazel & Verdie's

Fabric printing block | Hazel & Verdie's
I’ve personally never seen anything like this (unless you count the potato printing block I saw in an issue of Pack O’Fun and always wanted to make but my mother would never approve because she didn’t need paint-covered potatoes or something).

This primitive printing technique goes back thousands of years, although it’s certainly more likely this block is from the 1800’s. I love finding items like this because it helps me understand that so many things we take for granted – tasks that are automated today – were once done painstakingly by hand… in some cases with a potato.

More soon,

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More flea markets on a long weekend

Editor’s note: I wrote this post back in early August, but had to publish another post before I could publish this one. The four-day weekend referenced in this post was the first weekend in August.

It’s Monday as I write this and I’m on day 4 of a four-day weekend. I’m planning to spend the afternoon helping my daughter clean her apartment. She is just back from six months living in Orlando, working at Walt Disney World as part of their college program. I had a great time going to visit her in May – we spent Mother’s Day at the Atlantic Ocean and the following day from open til close at The Magic Kingdom.

Atlantic Ocean 2016 | Hazel & Verdie's

At the Magic Kingdom 2016 | Hazel & Verdie's

 

She arrived home last night and now she heads back to her apartment in Ames to start a new school year at Iowa State University. But not without a deep clean of the apartment, and copious amounts of laundry!

Meanwhile, Greg & I spent the first two days of our long weekend at a fabulous outdoor flea market in What Cheer, Iowa, followed by an overnight stay at The Catfish Place Campground in Arbela, Missouri, then a visit to the outdoor market in Colony, Missouri.

The What Cheer market was excellent – we have been on the lookout for a few specific items lately, items we have noted are selling well in the antique malls where we have our booths. We were lucky to find a couple of them: in particular a wooden ladder and a small wooden barn gate. Here are some pictures from What Cheer – their next market is September 30-October 2.

What Cheer IA Flea Market | Hazel & Verdie's

What Cheer IA Flea Market | Hazel & Verdie's

What Cheer IA Flea Market | Hazel & Verdie's

What Cheer IA Flea Market | Hazel & Verdie's
En route to Arbela, we stopped at a couple of small-town antique stores. This one in particular was fantastic: Anderson’s/Cherry Grove Antiques in Downing, MO. This shop is amazing – rooms and shelves piled high enough that you get to dig a little for treasure, but overall very well organized and one of those places that is much bigger inside than it looks from the street. Unlike a lot of shops, this one also makes full use of its basement area. That’s where I took most of my pictures – it was amazing!

Anderson's Antiques, Downing MO | Hazel & Verdie's

Anderson's Antiques, Downing MO | Hazel & Verdie's

Anderson's Antiques, Downing MO | Hazel & Verdie's

Anderson's Antiques, Downing MO | Hazel & Verdie's

Anderson's Antiques, Downing MO | Hazel & Verdie's

Our stay at The Catfish Place was quiet and uneventful – this is a small family-owned facility that includes primitive and full hook-up camp sites, a few cabins, a restaurant, swimming pool, shower house, and small ponds with rentable water toys. A few of these amenities were in a bit of disrepair during our stay, but our waterfront spot was quiet with a beautiful view of the sunset and the opportunity to interact with a trio of pretty ducks. (Confession: I fed them pieces of potato chips and named them Bob, Ted, and Felicia. Of the three, Ted was the only one who wouldn’t take the chips right from my fingers.) Our camping spot was quite affordable at $13 for the night, and the one amenity we really needed – the shower – worked great. So it was well worth it!

Catfish Place, Arbela MO | Hazel & Verdie's

Catfish Place, Arbela MO | Hazel & Verdie's

Catfish Place, Arbela MO | Hazel & Verdie's

 

On Saturday we headed a few miles down the road to Colony. This market takes place two weekends a month throughout the Spring, Summer and Fall. On one of those weekends, it coincides with the Rutledge Flea Market about 4 miles away. We attended both of these markets back in April, and thought at the time that we might come back down to Colony since we had previously walked that one toward the end of a rather long day.

On this trip, we came down on the weekend when only the Colony market was open. This turned out to be a disappointing mistake. The Colony market is notably smaller than Rutledge, and on the day (Saturday) when it should have been the busiest, literally only four vendors were open when we walked through an hour after the posted opening time. Needless to say we concluded our walk-through in record time and headed back to Des Moines, and we were home by early afternoon.

Despite the lackluster showing at Colony, we had, once again, a great weekend of treasure-hunting and campsite-sitting. Many good weekends left in this outdoor market season!

More soon,

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Vintage Treasure Tuesday #1

I’m starting a new series here on the blog to highlight some of the interesting things we find in our treasure hunting ventures…  auctions, thrift stores, flea markets large and small… all are great sources for the items we acquire and re-sell. Some of them intrigue me to the point where I feel compelled to research them and learn a little more about them. Such is the piece I’m featuring on this very first Vintage Treasure Tuesday.

Wellsville Pee Pot | Hazel & Verdie's

Wellsville Pee Pot | Hazel & Verdie's

 

I bought this pretty little vessel at a rural auction last year. Because of its size – the opening is about 11 inches across – I assumed it was a chamber pot. Because we as a nation haven’t really used chamber pots for many decades, I knew this piece had the potential to be a true antique – meaning, 100 years old or more.

A bit of internet research based on the backstamp shown on the bottom of the piece tells me that my pee pot was made by the West End Pottery Co. of Wellsville, Ohio. The word “Cuban” refers to the shape of the piece – the low, wide stance and beautifully curved bowl. I imagine it came with a lid, long since broken and discarded.

Wellsville Pee Pot | Hazel & Verdie's

This company manufactured dinner-, toilet- and hotel-ware from 1893-1938. Specifically, the mark on my piece indicates that it is ironstone toilet-ware made sometime between 1893-1910. That means the piece is anywhere from 106 – 123 years old!

Wellsville Pee Pot | Hazel & Verdie's

Wellsville Pee Pot | Hazel & Verdie's

 

That it has survived all these decades simply astounds me. I have put it in what I think is a safe place, hopeful it will survive a few more decades before I manage to drop it or otherwise smash it into a zillion pieces.

Wellsville Pee Pot | Hazel & Verdie's
Completely as an aside… can you imagine what it would be like to actually have to use one of these on a regular basis? Simple enough for a man… but for women… I assume you just sort of… squat over it? I just… I can’t… let’s just say I’m glad I was born after the advent of indoor plumbing.

More soon,

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Fresh picked goodies from Rutledge & Colony

Editor’s note: Today I went to write up a little post about our weekend flea market trip; I wanted to remind myself of all the items we bought on our trip this past Spring to the Rutledge and Colony markets in Missouri, but couldn’t find the blog post I KNEW I had written! Turns out, it was still in my post drafts – I wrote it back in May, but never published it! So – in advance of the upcoming post about our more recent trip, here’s the post I never published from May!

 

Been meaning to share a little more about the items we “picked” recently at the Rutledge and Colony, Missouri outdoor flea markets. One of the things we thoroughly enjoyed about visiting these new-to-us locations was the fact that among the many familiar items, we also found some things that were totally unique – things we had never seen before. Of course, being a tiny operation with limited funds and vehicle space, we couldn’t acquire them all. But we did manage to bring home several oldies-but-goodies.

One item I was specifically looking for was rusty coat hooks. Hit that nail on the head right away at the first vendor. In fact, upon closer inspection, the hooks I found were a bit too rusty… a thin bright orange layer coated them in a suspiciously even fashion, as though they had been soaked purposely in water. Didn’t really matter… they were cast iron, and with a little clean-up in vinegar and water, they ended up with just the right amount of patina to be used on some barnboards. Along with them, we also picked up some small cast iron stars.

Rutledge hooks and stars | Hazel & Verdie
More rusty goodness… several vintage tools, an antique buggy step, and clamp-on ice skates.

Rusty tools & goodness | Hazel & Verdie
Also on our shopping list, wooden baseball bats. We had a customer already in the pocket for these, and managed to find several at a very agreeable price. We hear tell she’s making a slugger-themed headboard for a grandson.

Wooden bats | Hazel & Verdie
Casters, for one of our own projects. We found some nifty wheels plus a whole coffee can full of casters!

Wheels & Casters | Hazel & Verdie
I can’t pass up amateur art, and picked up this sweet little hand-painted owl. He looks mod-70’s to me!

Hand painted owl | Hazel & Verdie
This great chippy white chair has seen its final days in the dining room, but would still look great in the garden.

Chippy white chair | Hazel & Verdie
Here’s a thing we didn’t recognize at all – turns out it’s an antique hay bale lifter. We actually found three of them over the course of the day, and purchased two. I think they’d be great in the garden, either as trellises or for hanging a flowering basket.

Antique hay baler | Hazel & Verdie
And probably my personal favorite find of the day: what appeared to be a simple wooden lidded box, but turned out to be an outdoor potty chair. Just place your least favorite enamel pot or galvanized bucket under the removable seat, and… go!

Vintage potty chair | Hazel & Verdie
All of our items from Rutledge have been “deployed,” so to speak – they’re for sale in the booths or in use for projects as intended. We’re looking forward to another trip soon!

Our Rutledge Picks | Hazel & Verdie

More soon,

Hazel & Verdie's